Applied Salt-Rock Mechanics. The in-situ behavior of salt by C. A. Baar

By C. A. Baar

Utilized Salt-Rock Mechanics 1

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Applied Salt-Rock Mechanics. The in-situ behavior of salt rocks

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1 Primary and diagenetic features in shallow-water deposits It is a matter of definition and opinion to draw the exact boundary between strictly primary crystallization and diagenetic crystallization or recrystallization. The problems become apparent from Figs. 2-12 and 2-13: 36 it could be argued that only chevron halite is truly primary, while the clear halite and other components are not; on the other hand, in cases of pre­ dominant crystallization at or near the bottom of a deep basin, the minerals would be termed primary, although associated with hopper crystals of halite which had formed earlier at the surface of the brine body.

3. 1. It should be pointed out here that secondary crystallization of layers of salt rocks, be it halite, sylvite or carnallite, is an important prerequisite for occlusion of gases; another prerequisite is the temporary existence of bed separations. , Hoppe (1958). Consequently, such 44 relatively thin layers with occluded gases are indicative of the mechanism shown in Fig. 2-19; this has been confirmed by bromine investigations which show high values in layers of secondary salts, while normal levels of bromine contents above the potash horizon indicate dilution of the brine body to such an extent that primary potash deposition became impossible (Baar, 1963).

42 Fig. 2-20. Deformations caused by carnallite conversion to sylvite (Baar, 1958). Final state after re-consolidation, shown in a schematic section of geological condi­ tions encountered after events schematized in Fig. 2-19. Carnallite stippled; Sy - sylvinite; 1 = former shear fracture; 2 = former bed separa­ tion void. On the basis of evidence from underground observations in numerous potash mines, Baar (1958) suggested the mechanism schematized in Figs. 2-19 and 2-20: due to the loss of volume of carnallitic salt in the course of alterations as shown in Fig.

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